Some women find that cancer treatment affects or damages their fertility. For some of these women, once treatment ends, natural conception and childbearing are no longer options. It is important to ask your oncologist about possible risks that treatment could pose to your future fertility so that you can take steps to preserve your fertility if you choose to.

Questions To Ask Your Healthcare Provider

  • Will cancer treatments affect my fertility?
  • Are there alternative ways to treat the cancer without compromising my fertility?
  • What are my fertility preservation options?
  • How much time do I have to preserve my fertility before I need to start cancer treatment?
  • Is the cancer estrogen sensitive? If so, how does that affect my reproductive options—now and later?
  • How will I know if I am fertile after treatment? Are there tests that I can take?
  • Are premature ovarian failure or hormone deficiencies possible side effects of treatment? If so, how do I treat them?
  • After treatment is over, how long will it take for my periods to begin again? If I am not having periods, should I still use contraceptives?
  • If I do not preserve my fertility, what are my parenthood options after treatment?
  • Is pregnancy safe for me after treatment? If so, how long should I wait after treatment to become pregnant?
  • What are the risks to my children based on the cancer I have and the treatment I receive?
  • Can you refer me to a reproductive endocrinologist?

Fertility and Cancer Treatment - in depth.

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