Bone & Joint Health

It’s easy to address health problems that we can see and feel – however, one common health concern can easily escape our notice: bone health. Bone loss – or osteoporosis – is common as we age and can affect men as well as women. Bone loss is a silent condition. It has no symptoms and occurs slowly over the years. Many people have no idea that they have suffered bone loss until one day, they trip, fall, and fracture a bone.

Bone loss affects everyone and we can all benefit from learning about the causes and consequences of bone loss, as well as approaches to prevention and treatment. Cancer patients are particularly susceptible to bone loss because several types of cancer treatment are known to decrease bone density. However, there are steps that can be taken to address this problem, including medications that have been shown to help prevent bone loss.

Living with Arthritis: Laughter Matters

Laughter offers significant physical and emotional benefits for those living with chronic illness. By Iris Zink, MSN, NP I learned early on about the therapeutic benefits of humor. My three older sisters raised me; when I was about five, my older sister, Kim, took me to the doctor, and I had to get blood drawn. […]

Understanding Low Back Pain

By David Borenstein, MD About 80 percent of the world’s population has had a back problem; looking at back pain over a lifespan, women are affected a bit more than men. This means that, more likely than not, you are going to experi­ence this problem in your lifetime. In most circumstances back pain resolves gradually […]

Exercise is Key in Prevention of Acute Low Back Pain

By David Borenstein, MD Executive Editor theSpineCommunity.com About 80 percent of the world’s population has an episode of low back pain sometime during their lives. Would it not be great if we had a way to prevent some of those episodes? You would think that we would have figured this problem out long ago since […]

Exercise Reduces Chronic Low Back Pain

By David Borenstein, MD Executive Editor, theSpineCommunity.com Lower back pain is second only to the cold as the most common affliction of mankind. Each year in the United States, up to 20 percent of the population will have an episode. Back pain is a common cause of work absence and disability. Historically, for episodes of […]

Handling Osteoarthritis

Occupational therapy can play a role in prevention and ongoing management for patients living with osteoarthritis in their hands. Opening a jar, buttoning a shirt or brushing your teeth are everyday activities that feel far from routine for those with arthritis in their hands, a common condition causing pain and disability for millions of Americans. […]

Do You Need A Daily Calcium Supplement?

A clear understanding of how much calcium you are already getting through your diet should precede supplement use. By Diane L. Schneider, MD Many women have questions about calci­um supplements. Should you be taking a daily supplement? The answer is yes, no, or maybe, depending on what you are eating and what other supplements you […]

Mindful Management: Living with Autoimmune Disease

Five steps people living with autoimmune diseases can take to incorporate mindfulness and improve quality of life.  By Elizabeth Kirchner, CNP Mindfulness is a buzzword that seems to be everywhere, but what does it actually mean? In the most basic sense, mindfulness is sim­ply awareness. Being aware of some of the most fundamental aspects of […]

Give Your Kids a Head Start on Healthy Bones

By Mia James Bone health is a hot topic for women—from diets to build strong bones and exercise to maintain strength as we age. But let’s not forget about the next generation when we talk about sturdy skeletons. Even though we tend to think of weak and thinning bones as a concern of middle age […]

A New Role: A Young RA Advocate Makes Her Mark

An actress shares her person­al journey with rheumatoid arthritis to offer the comfort of community to other patients. By Diana Price To fans following actress Megan Park’s career tra­jectory since she gained promi­nence in Hollywood through her por­trayal of cheerleader Grace Bowman on ABC Family’s The Secret Life of an American Teenager, the sailing has […]

More than A Bit of Back Pain: Ankylosing Spondylitis

Women can suffer for years before being diagnosed with this chronic inflammation of the spine. By David Borenstein, MD My patient, Sarah Wise, a 26-year-old woman, came to my office with a typical story. In her late teens, she noticed some low back and neck pain. Sarah was active in school sports, and her discomfort […]

Bone-building Moves

  By Maryann Hammers Your bones have supported you all these years. Isn’t it time you returned the favor? Sure, you make certain your diet includes plenty of calcium and ample Vitamin D, but diet is just half the battle. Exercise—especially weight-bearing and muscle-strengthening moves—is the other 50 percent of the equation. Balance exercises can […]

“B” Is for “Bone Health: Vitamin B Might Help Keep Your Bones Strong

Calcium-rich foods aren’t the only thing you can eat to keep your bones strong. Research suggests that vitamin B might also help you maintain bone health. Over the years research has taught us that we can help keep our bones strong as we age with weight-bearing exercise and a diet rich in calcium along with […]

Young RA Patients Choosing Treatment Look to Trusted Source: Mom

For young people, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a lot to handle. Add difficult treatment decisions to the mix, and it’s understandable that many patients are overwhelmed. This is where support from family and friends—people in addition to the care team—can be invaluable.

Building Bone Health

Skeletal health is hardly at the top of anyone’s list of big health concerns. We worry about heart health, cancer, diabetes, and other health problems—but what about osteoporosis?

Stomach Bugs and Other Unpleasant Infections May Help Prevent RA

We rarely think of an infection as a good thing, but recent evidence suggests that certain bugs may help protect against rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In a study conducted in Sweden, researchers found that people with recent stomach or urinary tract infections had a lower risk of developing RA.